If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We are Open - (708) 385-4520
Accepting Telehealth appointments

Crestwood (708) 385-4520
Orland Park (708) 403-7250
Summit (773) 229-8200

Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor circulation to the lower extremities due to a buildup of arterial plaque. Common symptoms include painful leg cramps, especially after walking, and leg and foot numbness and weakness. Having PAD can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke, which makes diagnosing and treating this condition a top priority. For PAD patients, doctors often recommend lifestyle modifications to manage symptoms and reduce the risk of having a stroke or heart attack. These modifications may include quitting smoking, changing your diet to lower your cholesterol, controlling hypertension and diabetes through medications, and exercising. Treatment options for PAD differ based on the severity of the disease. A doctor might recommend an exercise regimen to increase mobility and medications to improve circulation and reduce pain. Consult with a podiatrist to find the treatments and management strategies that are right for you.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Mark Gagnon from Advanced Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Crestwood, Orland Park, and Summit, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Ingrown toenails occur when the toenail pierces the skin at the fold of the nail. Some common causes of ingrown toenails may include trauma, improper toenail cutting, shoes that are too tight, sweaty feet, and medications. Ingrown toenails can also be recognized by the swelling and inflammation around the toenail that is painful when pressure is applied.  While there are many home remedies that can help reduce the pain of an ingrown toenail, it is important to visit a podiatrist in order to prevent an infection or further damage from occurring. Your podiatrist can provide a variety of home remedies, as well as provide surgical options if necessary.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Mark Gagnon of Advanced Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Crestwood, Orland Park, and Summit, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Friday, 24 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 20 July 2020 00:00

Stress fractures are small cracks that can appear in a bone, typically due to overuse. They are most common in the foot, and they develop over time and can become painful. Treatment depends on the severity of the fracture, but always focuses on pain relief and restoring function. After completing a physical examination, the doctor may request an X-ray to confirm the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, treatment may include resting, icing, compressing, and elevating the affected foot (also known as the RICE method), modifying physical activities until the foot has healed, and recommending appropriate footwear or a walking boot to minimize further damage and promote healing. In more severe cases, surgery may be required. If you are experiencing pain in your foot and suspect a stress fracture, talk to your podiatrist today. 

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Mark Gagnon from Advanced Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Crestwood, Orland Park, and Summit, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Connect with us